Click. Collect. Clean Air.

This is a blog within Place Magazine

A behaviour change campaign promoting ‘click & collect’ for online shopping purchases instead of personal deliveries to work.

No one likes missing a delivery at home, but having online shopping sent to work addresses in town centres adds to traffic congestion and air pollution. (It also means consumers have to carry shopping home on the bus or train!).  

Barclaycard[1] has revealed that 40% of online shoppers chose to have their purchases sent to their professional address, with 8% of people receiving deliveries to their workplace on a daily basis. For example, in the West End, a workforce of 150,000 would therefore mean a whopping 12,000 parcels estimated to be delivered into the area every day.  The volume of vehicles required to facilitate this is a key contributor to the poor air quality in London, and other UK town centres.Another stroy to be found in Place Magazine

Cross River Partnership and our partners are urging workers to take vital steps towards cleaner air and reducing health risk by rethinking how they manage their online shopping habits during Christmas shopping and January sales seasons.

There are now a number of ways for individuals to click and collect their online purchases to avoid having items delivered to their workplace, such as Amazon Lockers, InPost, Parcelly, HubBox and Doddle. These companies provide consolidated deliveries to convenient locations for consumers, and work with businesses to provide corporate membership and discount offers for employees.

Cross River Partnership’s ‘Click. Collect. Clean Air’ campaign brings all these solutions together.  Click. Collect. Clean Air. has been promoted to businesses and central London employees by over 20 business improvement districts and boroughs since launching a year ago. 

The campaign promotes the use of Click & Collect services to reduce the number of missed deliveries and redirect personal packages from workplaces to parcel collection points closer to consumers’ homes.  Delivery of online shopping to ‘Click & Collect’ sites helps reduce the number of vans on central London streets, reducing air pollution and making for a nicer, safer and healthier place to visit, shop and work.

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Central to the campaign is a unique website, www.clickcollect.london, which maps parcel collection points across London and the U.K. With hundreds of locations from multiple providers, the site makes it easy for online shoppers to find a convenient collection point close to home or along commute routes.

As part of the campaign, CRP worked with Parcelly to provide an introductory discount code (CLEANAIR) to encourage use of Parcelly’s premium Click & Collect option. CRP’s collaboration with Parcelly provided positive results including use of the ‘CLEANAIR’ promo code 3,466 times since the launch of Click. Collect. Clean Air.  Of the Click & Collect deliveries made by those using the code, 90% are now being delivered outside London zones 1 & 2 where air pollution is the worst.

Parcelly also donate 5% per transaction to reduce the environmental impact of their service which has offset 800kg of CO2 (see http://parcelly.com/live-green). This is in addition to emissions avoided due to the reduction in failed deliveries and fewer driver destinations resulting from Click & Collect deliveries. 

With Christmas shopping season, and January sales upon us, be sure to choose Click & Collect for delivery and collection of online shopping. Find a convenient collection point at www.clickcollect.london. It’s convenient, easy and affordable.

For more information contact vickykeeble@crossriverpartnership.org or visit www.crossriverpartnership.org

  

About Cross River Partnership

Cross River Partnership is central London’s largest public-private partnership that has been delivering regeneration projects in the capital since 1994. Over the last 22 years CRP has worked to support sustainable growth across London, developing and delivering innovative pilot projects with, and for our partners, including 19 Business Improvement Districts, local authorities and public service providers such as TfL. 

CRP has four core delivery programmes covering the key issues that help the city thrive: creating sustainable employment opportunities, driving economic growth and prosperity, making places that work, and improving air quality and carbon reduction. 

[1] https://www.home.barclaycard/media-centre/press-releases/post-room-boom.html

 

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LeedsBID to improve commercial waste and recycling for businesses

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A new commercial waste and recycling collection service to be introduced in Leeds city centre aims to help save businesses money while enhancing street aesthetics.

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Leeds Business Improvement District (LeedsBID), working in partnership with Leeds-based Forge Recycling, is to deliver a new collection service to over 1,000 businesses.

The new service, introduced in the new year, comes in response to a LeedsBID survey which showed that 43% of its levy payers wanted to see improvements to their collection contracts.

The new trade waste service is part of LeedsBID’s business priorities to help its levy payers reduce costs while also contributing to improving the appearance of the city centre. 

LeedsBID Chief Executive Andrew Cooper said: “The contract demonstrates how businesses can work together to achieve economies of scale. The ambition is to save money, improve recycling and enhance street aesthetics by having a regular and quality waste service.”

“BIDs elsewhere in the UK have employed similar schemes and we will be working collaboratively with Forge to ensure a first-class service for all businesses in Leeds.”

Forge will be offering a seven day a week service with collections timed to ensure trade sacks and loose waste are not left out on city centre streets overnight.

When businesses sign up, they will receive a free waste audit to check how they could save money, and will be able to receive a free collection of waste cardboard each week.waste and collections service in LeedThe contract has been designed so that the more businesses who opt into the service, the more money they will all save. It is hoped that local businesses will work together to repeat the success of similar schemes elsewhere in the UK.

LeedsBID will play an ongoing role, alongside Forge, working together to increase recycling and ensuring that prices stay low over the lifetime of the contract. 

LeedsBID selected the company through an extensive competitive bidding process, designed by waste consultants Eunomia, which looked at both price and quality of service.

 

More stories like this one from Leeds BID can be found in Place Magazine each month

 

Communities Make Places

Communities make places by Alison Bowcott-McGrath

Communities should nurture civic pride

 

In a recent white paper, the Local Government Association acknowledged a growing recognition of the importance of cultural activities in the lives of people, communities and places. It states, “What is local and unique has special value and should be supported and encouraged.” Cultural identity is strongly tied to a sense of belonging, engagement, understanding and appreciation of where people live. Civic pride raises the confidence and aspirations of a community.

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Above and beyond urban design, placemaking is instrumental in shaping our environment to better serve the community and support its future growth. It’s about defining space through cultural creativity, economic activity, and social connectivity. Listening to the community is key, residents provide important information used in assessing the effective delivery of services that are meant to benefit them. As placemaking professionals, the earlier we involve them, the better.  

Seems obvious really doesn’t it? It’s about listening to the people whose lives we affect in the places we regenerate. It’s about forming strong partnerships between local government, the private sector and community organisations to pool our resources, knowledge and expertise.

An inspiring example is the Camden Highline. Taking its cue from NYC’s famous park, The Highline, Camden BID (Camden Unlimited) is spearheading a crowdfunding campaign to raise funds for a feasibility study towards making the project a reality. London mayor, Sadiq Khan joins over 200 residents, community groups and businesses that have already pledged support to turn a half-mile stretch of disused railway line into a new public park and garden walk.

Inspiring Communities

Urban gardening project, Incredible Edible in Todmorden was started by a group of like-minded people whose aim was to bring people together in building a kinder, more sustainable community, and help change attitudes and behaviour towards the environment. The locally grown food is shared by the community and since its conception in 2008 has become a full-fledged movement. Their ethos has been taken up by communities all over the world and there are now 120 Incredible Edible official groups in the UK and more than 700 worldwide.

Finally, after attending the annual conference of the Institute Place Management in Manchester a few weeks ago, a couple of other initiatives caught my attention:

Jan Brown from Liverpool John Moores University, presented “Connecting the Sound Tracks of Our Lives: Marketing Places Through Music.” Jan proposed innovative marketing campaigns using various media to create multisensory communications. Her paper explores the various music styles of a place and how they connect the community inclusively.

In her book, Cara Courage, a collaborative creative placemaker and arts consultant, explores the role of art in placemaking in urban environments. She analyses how artists and communities use arts to improve their quality of life and explores the concept of social practice placemaking, where artists and members of the community are equal experts in the process. Arts in Place. The Arts, the Urban and Social Practice by Cara Courage

Working together, as an inclusive community that includes professional placemakers, artists, musicians, local councils and residents, we can create better places to live. When the environment inspires us, our connections strengthen and we become truly aware of the community.Revive & Thrive Corporate Advocate PinPointer writing about inspiring communities

Alison Bowcott-McGrath

Founder and Managing Director

PinPointer UK and MAYNINETEEN Ltd

Building 8, Exchange Quay, Salford, Greater Manchester, M5 3EJ

E: alison@pinpointer.uk | T: 0161 850 1400 | M: 07870 176949