Wolverhampton BID – Life as a Project Manager in a BID

The many joys of being a Project Manager within Wolverhampton BID

Since joining Wolverhampton BID in April in the role of Projects Manager it’s opened my eyes to the diverse skills and multi-tasking requirements of the role, working in a busy BID office. Drawing on my extensive retail and customer service background it has enabled me to redirect the focus & role of the BID Ambassador Team, from its original street warden patrols and general public engagement role to an integral support role for both City centre visitors to Wolverhampton and the BID businesses within the city.

Life experineces such as this are always featured in Place Magazine
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The refocused approach was brought about by the recruitment of 3 new members of the team Jo, Sally and Heidi, who joined the original members Wendy and Mick.  There was real emphasis that the new members needed to compliment and strengthen the existing team, whilst having strong customer service focus in their skill sets. The new team members brought with them a wealth of retail and customer service experience, an ability to see in great depth the city centre from the business’s perspective. Luckily for the businesses, visitors and shoppers of Wolverhampton the new approach and team has paid dividends, as the drive and enthusiasm they express towards the goals of Wolverhampton BID and the thriving city centre is infectious.

The Ambassador Team is so much more than just a meet and greet service, they are the friendly face of the city centre, the walking talking visitor information service, the travel information team, first aid support, the business engagement team and 2 members of team have also successfully achieved SIA CCTV operator status, , thus ensuring that they can strengthen the Join Revive & Thrive - a membership for all people passionate about placesupport offered to the levy payers, they can monitor, assist and direct resources to deal with negative behaviour within the city centre – they really are the eyes and ears of the city, and no 2 days are ever the same.

As re-ballot in 2020 is fast approaching we would hope that the hard work of both the Ambassadors and the Wolverhampton BID team to meet the wants, needs and expectations of the business community have been understood, met or exceeded, and that the re vote for a second term supports the future of Wolverhampton city centre and its businesses to grow, be prosperous and support the continued growth and regeneration of this great city.

Shaun Boyce, Projects Manager
Wolverhampton BID

New industry body renews High Street optimism

Revive & Thrive is pleased to support BID Foundation

The BID Foundation launch is welcome news for the Business Improvement District industry

Revive & Thrive is very pleased to share the following announcement about the launch of the BID Foundation.

All involved in place management will know that national representation for Business Improvement Districts (BIDs) has been in a state of flux for at least two years now.  Revive & Thrive is pleased that the BID Foundation will be addressing this.Success of BID Foundation is crucial for the Business Improvement District industry

Revive & Thrive and Place Magazine stands in a unique position in being open to BIDs and all towns or cities, irrespective of size, and all organisations representing place.  Its membership and subscriptions complements and does not conflict or compete with the aims of the BID Foundation.

All at Revive & Thrive and Place Magazine fully support the BID Foundation and offer full support in making this new organisation, built on strong foundations, a great success.

Revive & Thrive and Place Magazine offers its resources and networks to help in anyway to ensure BID Foundation success.

BID Foundation Press Release 17th January 2017

The BID Foundation has launched today (Wednesday 17th January) to meet challenges facing commercial districts up and down the country. Against a back-drop of ever-more difficult trading conditions and local government cuts, the new industry-led body will help Business Improvement Districts (BIDs) manage town and city centre retail, leisure, and other commercial areas more effectively.

The new membership organisation is an alliance of leading BIDs and the Institute of Place Management at Manchester Metropolitan University, which has been appointed as its independent operator. The BID Foundation was set up in response to wide-scale consultation and is led by an elected council of 14 BID Chief Executives from across the country.

Commenting on the launch, Andrew Cooper, Chair of The BID Foundation and CEO of Leeds BID, said: “BIDs will now be able to work together more successfully to encourage change and investment in our town and city centres. We want BIDs to make an even more significant contribution locally and nationally and we need to engage more meaningfully with local and national governments and the wider business community to do that.”

The new industry body will provide strategic direction and practical support to BIDs. It will champion the revitalisation of the high street and commercial areas by raising standards, sharing knowledge and resources, and building a trusted and representative voice.

The BID concept started 15 years ago in the UK, with the operational priorities of making areas cleaner, safer and more attractive.  This remit has matured, meaning BIDs are increasingly working with local partners to influence the economic development of the areas they manage and address big issues such as rough sleeping. Now there are nearly 300 UK BIDs and around 25 new ones are being elected each year.  Annually, BIDs contribute a total £110 million investment to UK towns and cities. 

Stefan Gurney, Vice Chair of The BID Foundation and Executive Director of Norwich BID, said: “It is great to be at the forefront of setting the vision and strategy for the future direction of the BIDs industry. The BID Foundation has been developed by the BID community and we aim to represent the industry with a clear, collaborative voice.”

The Institute of Place Management will provide specialist support and Revive & Thrive wishes the BID Foundation the best of luckaccreditation to members of The BID Foundation to ensure consistent high standards of operation, accountability, and transparency. BIDs will also draw on innovation and research insights from the Institute to inform their future business plans.

According to recent research from the Institute, the fundamental reason many commercial areas are struggling, is that decision makers and stakeholders do not adapt effectively to ongoing changes because they do not act collectively. BIDs provide this essential collaborative approach because they are business-led partnerships where retailers and other services pay an additional levy to fund a collective business plan aimed at improving a specific area.

Chair of the Institute of Place Management, Professor Cathy Parker, said: “We know how important BIDs are and The BID Foundation offers a way to increase both the local impact of each BID involved and further develop the model as a trusted form of urban management.”

The BID Foundation is open to membership from any operating BID. More details are available at www.thebidfoundation.com


The BID Foundation

The BID Foundation is the new industry-led body for Business Improvement Districts created in response to wide-scale consultation. The BID Foundation is an alliance of leading BIDs and the Institute of Place Management at Manchester Metropolitan University. The BID Foundation has been created to elevate standards, lobby and provide practical support to those within the Business Improvement District industry.

A council of BID senior practitioners govern The BID Foundation.  Nominations for council election were held in 2017 and 14 BID CEOs have been elected to serve by their peers.

Link: www.thebidfoundation.com

Contact: Andrew Cooper (Chair of The BID Foundation and CEO of Leeds BID)

Email: andrew.cooper@leedsbid.co.uk

Click. Collect. Clean Air.

This is a blog within Place Magazine

A behaviour change campaign promoting ‘click & collect’ for online shopping purchases instead of personal deliveries to work.

No one likes missing a delivery at home, but having online shopping sent to work addresses in town centres adds to traffic congestion and air pollution. (It also means consumers have to carry shopping home on the bus or train!).  

Barclaycard[1] has revealed that 40% of online shoppers chose to have their purchases sent to their professional address, with 8% of people receiving deliveries to their workplace on a daily basis. For example, in the West End, a workforce of 150,000 would therefore mean a whopping 12,000 parcels estimated to be delivered into the area every day.  The volume of vehicles required to facilitate this is a key contributor to the poor air quality in London, and other UK town centres.Another stroy to be found in Place Magazine

Cross River Partnership and our partners are urging workers to take vital steps towards cleaner air and reducing health risk by rethinking how they manage their online shopping habits during Christmas shopping and January sales seasons.

There are now a number of ways for individuals to click and collect their online purchases to avoid having items delivered to their workplace, such as Amazon Lockers, InPost, Parcelly, HubBox and Doddle. These companies provide consolidated deliveries to convenient locations for consumers, and work with businesses to provide corporate membership and discount offers for employees.

Cross River Partnership’s ‘Click. Collect. Clean Air’ campaign brings all these solutions together.  Click. Collect. Clean Air. has been promoted to businesses and central London employees by over 20 business improvement districts and boroughs since launching a year ago. 

The campaign promotes the use of Click & Collect services to reduce the number of missed deliveries and redirect personal packages from workplaces to parcel collection points closer to consumers’ homes.  Delivery of online shopping to ‘Click & Collect’ sites helps reduce the number of vans on central London streets, reducing air pollution and making for a nicer, safer and healthier place to visit, shop and work.

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Central to the campaign is a unique website, www.clickcollect.london, which maps parcel collection points across London and the U.K. With hundreds of locations from multiple providers, the site makes it easy for online shoppers to find a convenient collection point close to home or along commute routes.

As part of the campaign, CRP worked with Parcelly to provide an introductory discount code (CLEANAIR) to encourage use of Parcelly’s premium Click & Collect option. CRP’s collaboration with Parcelly provided positive results including use of the ‘CLEANAIR’ promo code 3,466 times since the launch of Click. Collect. Clean Air.  Of the Click & Collect deliveries made by those using the code, 90% are now being delivered outside London zones 1 & 2 where air pollution is the worst.

Parcelly also donate 5% per transaction to reduce the environmental impact of their service which has offset 800kg of CO2 (see http://parcelly.com/live-green). This is in addition to emissions avoided due to the reduction in failed deliveries and fewer driver destinations resulting from Click & Collect deliveries. 

With Christmas shopping season, and January sales upon us, be sure to choose Click & Collect for delivery and collection of online shopping. Find a convenient collection point at www.clickcollect.london. It’s convenient, easy and affordable.

For more information contact vickykeeble@crossriverpartnership.org or visit www.crossriverpartnership.org


About Cross River Partnership

Cross River Partnership is central London’s largest public-private partnership that has been delivering regeneration projects in the capital since 1994. Over the last 22 years CRP has worked to support sustainable growth across London, developing and delivering innovative pilot projects with, and for our partners, including 19 Business Improvement Districts, local authorities and public service providers such as TfL. 

CRP has four core delivery programmes covering the key issues that help the city thrive: creating sustainable employment opportunities, driving economic growth and prosperity, making places that work, and improving air quality and carbon reduction. 

[1] https://www.home.barclaycard/media-centre/press-releases/post-room-boom.html


More stories like this one from Leeds BID can be found in Place Magazine each month

LeedsBID to improve commercial waste and recycling for businesses

Stories about Business Improvement Districts can be found in Place Magazine

A new commercial waste and recycling collection service to be introduced in Leeds city centre aims to help save businesses money while enhancing street aesthetics.

This waste and recycling collection article can be found in Revive & Thrive's Place Magazine
Read more stories like this each month in Place Magazine

Leeds Business Improvement District (LeedsBID), working in partnership with Leeds-based Forge Recycling, is to deliver a new collection service to over 1,000 businesses.

The new service, introduced in the new year, comes in response to a LeedsBID survey which showed that 43% of its levy payers wanted to see improvements to their collection contracts.

The new trade waste service is part of LeedsBID’s business priorities to help its levy payers reduce costs while also contributing to improving the appearance of the city centre. 

LeedsBID Chief Executive Andrew Cooper said: “The contract demonstrates how businesses can work together to achieve economies of scale. The ambition is to save money, improve recycling and enhance street aesthetics by having a regular and quality waste service.”

“BIDs elsewhere in the UK have employed similar schemes and we will be working collaboratively with Forge to ensure a first-class service for all businesses in Leeds.”

Forge will be offering a seven day a week service with collections timed to ensure trade sacks and loose waste are not left out on city centre streets overnight.

When businesses sign up, they will receive a free waste audit to check how they could save money, and will be able to receive a free collection of waste cardboard each week.waste and collections service in LeedThe contract has been designed so that the more businesses who opt into the service, the more money they will all save. It is hoped that local businesses will work together to repeat the success of similar schemes elsewhere in the UK.

LeedsBID will play an ongoing role, alongside Forge, working together to increase recycling and ensuring that prices stay low over the lifetime of the contract. 

LeedsBID selected the company through an extensive competitive bidding process, designed by waste consultants Eunomia, which looked at both price and quality of service.


More stories like this one from Leeds BID can be found in Place Magazine each month


Art in Placemaking

Read lots of articles on Placemaking in Revive & Thrive's Place Magazine

The Role of Art in Placemaking

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According to PPS, placemaking is both a process and philosophy, strengthening the connection between people and the places they share. It capitalises on a local community’s assets, inspiration, and potential with the intention of creating public spaces that promote health happiness and well-being. Stimulating public artworks play a key role because they offer more than just passive observation. Culture is the perfect vehicle to engage communities and promote conversation about heritage, identity and sense of belonging. Great art makes great places, great places attract great talent, and great talent creates great jobs!

How UK BIDs can work with cultural organisations 

Improving Places, a new report produced by Arts Council England, examines how culture is key to the success of UK BIDs. By collaborating with cultural organisations, they can drive economic growth and help local communities thrive. In the uncertainty of post-Brexit Britain, they can also offer a potential solution to falling public funding and rising business rates. BIDs and cultural organisations that are positively connected can share information and plan joint marketing campaigns for maximum reach and impact. The report identifies six ways in which they can work together:

  1. Placemaking, by using local knowledge to help develop innovative neighbourhoods.
  2. Place branding, by promoting an area as distinctive and attractive for locals and visitors.
  3. Business development, by helping industry professionals and entrepreneurs grow their businesses.
  4. Providing affordable spaces.
  5. Involving local people will build stronger communities.
  6. Design a programme of creative activities to highlight a location’s unique offer and raise the public profile.

Obviously, there is no one-size-fits-all solution and local challenges will require local responses. But, to ensure coherent policies there needs to be an element of joined-up thinking with private enterprise, local government, BIDs, and cultural organisations all involved at the early planning stages.

Commissioning public artworksArt in Placemaking features in this month's Place Magazine

The Great Places conference last month, launched a year-long programme of initiatives from the BFP (British Property Federation) to examine the dynamics of successful places. The project aims to showcase the real estate industry’s collective role and social impact across the UK to clients, communities and government. Coinciding with the conference was the joint publication of A Guide to Commissioning Public Art by BPF and Contemporary Art Society which highlights how art contributes to a sense of place and identity.

Ian Fletcher, Director of Real Estate Policy at the BPF said:

“The real estate industry provides value to society beyond its economic contribution, but it needs to communicate the benefits that flow from long-term investment if it’s to win the hearts and minds of the people it serves. We hope our Great Places campaign hardwires placemaking into the real estate industry’s contribution to the nation’s social well-being.”  

Fabienne Nicholas, Head of Art Consultancy at the Contemporary Art Society said:

“Truly ambitious public art is now a key component of cultural placemaking, animating public realm and creating encounters that humanise and create meaning for places. It is often the art that contributes the most to that unique sense of place, supporting the identity and visibility of new developments and creating thriving sustainable communities.” 

Cities of Culture

Banksy's Art can be seen in places all around the UK
Bansky street cleaner – Chalk Farm, London

An example of how the arts can shape modern placemaking. Inspired by Liverpool’s 2008 European Capital of Culture status, the concept continues in the UK and in 2013 Derry/Londonderry reported that for every £1 of the £100m investment, £5 was earned for the city.

The University of Hull is about to release statistics on its tenure as 2017 City of Culture and the benefits to the economy. Key findings from the first 3 months include:

  • 90% of Hull residents attended or experienced a cultural event or activity as part of the UK’s City of Culture.
  • 70% of resident agreed it had a positive impact on the lives of local people.
  • 342,000 visitors came to ‘Made in Hull’ during opening week and 94% of the audience agreed the event made them feel more connected to the city, the stories of its people, the history and heritage.
  • Of the 1.1m people passing through Queen Victoria Square during the Blade installation, over 420,000 interacted with the artwork. 50% said it was the main influential reason for their visit that day and 46% said they would not have come if the Blade wasn’t there.

Last month, Manchester joined a network of 180 world cities recognised by UNESCO for their commitment to the arts. With over 10 UK cities already accredited by the organisation, Manchester follows Nottingham, Norwich and Edinburgh in becoming a UNESCO Creative City of Literature.  Winning is a real accolade and not just a title for one year, that reflects the depth of community involvement. Cities must have plans in place that continually improve access and participation in cultural life, especially for marginalised or vulnerable groups and individuals.

Earlier this week, at STC2017, I met Jean Cameron, Project Director for Paisley’s BID to be UK City of Culture 2021. A town of contrasts, Paisley’s heritage is stunning, thanks to its transformation into a textile hub during the industrial revolution, it is home to the largest concentration of listed buildings outside of Edinburgh. World-class business and international talent sit side by side with some of Scotland’s most deprived communities. Winning UK City of Culture 20121 is a chance to change that by reinventing the place and transforming the lives of locals.

Investment in culture has the power to do all that.Alison Bowcott-McGrath writes each month for Place Magazine

Alison Bowcott-McGrath

Founder and Managing Director

PinPointer UK and MAYNINETEEN Ltd

Building 8, Exchange Quay, Salford, Greater Manchester, M5 3EJ

E: alison@pinpointer.uk | T: 0161 850 1400 | M: 07870 176949